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The Wishing Game Review: Back-of-Book Description

NATIONAL BESTSELLER • Years ago, a reclusive mega-bestselling children’s author quit writing under mysterious circumstances. Suddenly he resurfaces with a brand-new book and a one-of-a-kind competition, offering a prize that will change the winner’s life in this absorbing and whimsical novel.

“Clever, dark, and hopeful . . . a love letter to reading and the power that childhood stories have over us long after we’ve grown up.”—V. E. Schwab, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue

A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: Washington Post, She Reads, Bookreporter

Make a wish. . . .

Lucy Hart knows better than anyone what it’s like to grow up without parents who loved her. In a childhood marked by neglect and loneliness, Lucy found her solace in books, namely the Clock Island series by Jack Masterson. Now a twenty-six-year-old teacher’s aide, she is able to share her love of reading with bright, young students, especially seven-year-old Christopher Lamb, who was left orphaned after the tragic death of his parents. Lucy would give anything to adopt Christopher, but even the idea of becoming a family seems like an impossible dream without proper funds and stability.

But be careful what you wish for. . . .

Just when Lucy is about to give up, Jack Masterson announces he’s finally written a new book. Even better, he’s holding a contest at his home on the real Clock Island, and Lucy is one of the four lucky contestants chosen to compete to win the one and only copy.

For Lucy, the chance of winning the most sought-after book in the world means everything to her and Christopher. But first she must contend with ruthless book collectors, wily opponents, and the distractingly handsome (and grumpy) Hugo Reese, the illustrator of the Clock Island books. Meanwhile, Jack “the Mastermind” Masterson is plotting the ultimate twist ending that could change all their lives forever.

. . . You might just get it..

The Wishing Game Review: My Thoughts

I chose this book one month a while back from Book of the Month based on the short description and maybe a sample of the first page. Then a friend mentioned she had the same book, so we decided to read The Wishing Game together. For some reason by that time, I thought that it was a sort of fantasy, sci-fi type book. But I quickly realized that I had it wrong.

Which was entirely my mistake! I would not consider this book in the fantasy genre at all, but I think I read somewhere that it was ‘magical realism’, which seems much more fitting. And really, the title and the entire back of book is about making wishes, so …it makes sense.

Genre blunder aside… I did enjoy a lot of elements of the book. The writing was ok for the most part, and there was enough light suspense and cliff hangers at the end of chapters to propel me forward. Actually, so far this year, it was one of the quickest book I have read.

I feel like the editing left much to be desired. There were several sentences that felt redundant, like they were unnecessarily reiterating thoughts or emotions that they had already expressed. And even some others where they literally repeated the same word or phrase, as though the author/editor didn’t realize they just said it seven words earlier. I found this sloppy and it completely pulled me out of the story.

While most of the characters seemed well-written, there were a few that were completely flat, with seemingly little effort made to present them as real, complete characters that belonged in the story. This might be an element of the genre? But I think it felt lazy and made certain actions and plot points unbelievable.

The setting descriptions were pretty good, I will give her that.

 
Favorite Quotes from The Wishing Game

“He was always impressed by his ability to believe the lies he told himself.”

“Wishing hadn’t delivered his dream to him; he’d had to work to make it come true.”

“What was the life an artist but paint and pain?”

“The stories write us, you see. we read something that moves us, touches us, speaks to us and it…it changes us.”

“Until you face your fears, your fears are winning.”

“Hate is a knife without a handle. You can’t cut something with it without cutting yourself.”

The Wishing Game Review: In Conclusion

I have slightly mixed feelings about this book. Looking at it for what it is and the genre it falls under (contemporary or magical realism) then I suppose it’s a fine, lovely, lighthearted read worth a decent rating. But just as a book on my list… 3 stars for The Wishing Game. I found some of the premise and behaviors weird and unbelievable, and the editing was just atrocious.

That said…I did find myself wondering how it would end and breezed through it pretty quickly. Maybe it would be a good beach read or something?

Check it out if you enjoy things like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or some other kind of whimsical tale involving children as main characters, or fantasies coming true.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read this review of The Wishing Game – feel free to share! Check out my other book reviews here and pin or share your favorite quotes below. 

“He was always impressed by his ability to believe the lies he told himself.”
“Wishing hadn’t delivered his dream to him; he’d had to work to make it come true.”
“Until you face your fears, your fears are winning.”
“The stories write us, you see. We read something that moves us, touches us, speaks to us and it…it changes us.”
“What was the life an artist but paint and pain?”
“Hate is a knife without a handle. You can’t cut something with it without cutting yourself.”
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