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​A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor Review: Back-of-Book Description

THE INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Who has the right to change the world forever?

How will we live online? 

How do we find comfort in an increasingly isolated world?

 

The Carls disappeared the same way they appeared, in an instant. While the robots were on Earth, they caused confusion and destruction with only their presence. Part of their maelstrom was the sudden viral fame and untimely death of April May: a young woman who stumbled into Carl’s path, giving them their name, becoming their advocate, and putting herself in the middle of an avalanche of conspiracy theories.

 

Months later, April’s friends are trying to find their footing in a post-Carl world. Andy has picked up April’s mantle of fame, speaking at conferences and online; Maya, ravaged by grief, begins to follow a string of mysteries that she is convinced will lead her to April; and Miranda is contemplating defying her friends’ advice and pursuing a new scientific operation…one that might have repercussions beyond anyone’s comprehension. Just as it is starting to seem like the gang may never learn the real story behind the events that changed their lives forever, a series of clues arrive—mysterious books that seem to predict the future and control the actions of their readers—all of which seems to suggest that April could be very much alive.

 

In the midst of the search for the truth and the search for April is a growing force, something that wants to capture our consciousness and even control our reality. A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor is the bold and brilliant follow-up to An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. It is a fast-paced adventure that is also a biting social commentary, asking hard, urgent questions about the way we live, our freedoms, our future, and how we handle the unknown.

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor Review: My Thoughts

Several months ago I posted a review for An Absolutely Remarkable Thing (click that title to read that review) and when I went to go post it on Goodreads I saw there was a sequel! I was so excited that I immediately ordered it on Amazon.

While I waited a few days for it to arrive, I picked up a thriller, but as soon as I was done with Things We Do in the Dark, I dove into A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor.

It was so lovely to be back in this world that Hank Green created! I was of course sitting in incredible anticipation to see what was about to happen and whether a certain character was still alive or not. This did fuel my interest, for sure.

I almost want to say that it would read ok on its own…but I’m not sure that it does. I think this is one that you would really want to read the original book first.

Now – I know what you might be thinking – “A sequel? Sequels suck!” But it doesn’t! It’s really good.

You might also be thinking – “A series? Do I have to?” But it’s only two books! And they are both terrific!

Anyways, if you’re debating whether to give it a shot, here are some things to know: Much like the first, it touches on themes of knowing who you are, standing up for a greater purpose, relationships (romantic and friendly), and the notion of virtual reality and how prevalent it should be. I found it engaging, thrilling, suspenseful, and emotional at times.

The characters remained interesting and well-rounded. Some of them had even greater development and arcs – new wants, new struggles, and even new faults. The settings remained easy to imagine (wait why isn’t this a movie or TV show yet?) and the dialogue was natural and allowed the story to flow seamlessly.

In general I just really enjoyed this writing and the way this author creates a world and a story within it. INCREDIBLE quotes, too! So relatable and relevant to the time we live in.

Favorite Quotes from A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor:

“…my constant sawing anxiety – the ever-present feeling that I was doing both too much and not enough.”

“We all want to be in the room where it happens, we want to be part of the things that matter to us, but no two people have the exact same collection of things that matter. Nowadays, I don’t so much want to be in the room where it happens, but I do really want to help people choose the right rooms, and help them realize that they really are a part of the things that matter. Because when we feel like none of the rooms we are in matter, that’s when we’re really lost.”

“Sometimes you need to buy a red dress because the alternative is the nightmare of loss.”

“Rich people, I have noticed, are good at looking the other way.”

“These are the lies our brains tell us to push happiness out of reach. What is the evolutionary purpose of that? Is happiness stagnation? Maybe. Maybe life (all life, not just human life) is nothing more than wanting something and being able to go for it. What is life without want? Satisfaction sounds lovely, but evolutionarily it was selected against.”

“The truest strength is shouldering the burden of care.”

“And it turns out, time does eventually pass no matter how anxious you are.”

“You are a story that you tell yourself, and even if it isn’t always accurate, it is who you are, and that is very important (to you).”

“This was always the way of these strongmen. They would craft the fear so carefully and then toss it into the world for everyone to use. And when someone took that fear and destroyed with it, they were just ‘unstable’ or ‘mentally ill’.”

“Guide To Working the Problem. It doesn’t matter what your problem is, only that you’re sick of it and you’re willing to work. Step 1: Understand your problem. Step 2: Understand your assets. Step 3: Understand your limitations. Step 4: Stir.”

“Powerful people always thought they had the solutions. What they couldn’t see was that their power was, itself, the problem.”

“You will always struggle with not feeling productive until you accept that your own joy can be something you produce. It is not the only thing you will make, nor should it be, but it is something valuable and beautiful.”

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor by Hank Green, a Review Click To Tweet

 

A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor Review: In Conclusion

5 stars! This sequel was just as exciting and thought-provoking as the first. A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor answers all the questions readers were left with in An Absolutely Remarkable Thing and so much more! The characters remained just as smart and witty and there were some new developments and new emotions introduced, as well.

I would recommend this two-part series to anyone who likes a touch of sci-fi in modern fiction, or who is looking for a light take on political commentary. Emphasis on the “light” take, as this one is even less political than the first one. While this is a terrific story, I would not recommend reading this book without first reading An Absolutely Remarkable Thing.

Thank you for taking the time to read this review of A Beautifully Foolish Endeavor – feel free to share! Check out my other book reviews here and pin or share your favorite quotes below. 

“You will always struggle with not feeling productive until you accept that your own joy can be something you produce. It is not the only thing you will make, nor should it be, but it is something valuable and beautiful.”
“…my constant sawing anxiety – the ever-present feeling that I was doing both too much and not enough.”
“You are a story that you tell yourself, and even if it isn’t always accurate, it is who you are, and that is very important to you.”
“Sometimes you need to buy a red dress because the alternative is the nightmare of loss.”<br />
“Powerful people always thought they had the solutions. What they couldn’t see was that their power was, itself, the problem.”
“The truest strength is shouldering the burden of care.”
“And it turns out, time does eventually pass no matter how anxious you are.”
“This was always the way of these strongmen. They would craft the fear so carefully and then toss it into the world for everyone to use. And when someone took that fear and destroyed with it, they were just ‘unstable’ or ‘mentally ill’.”
“We all want to be in the room where it happens, we want to be part of the things that matter to us, but no two people have the exact same collection of things that matter. Nowadays, I don’t so much want to be in the room where it happens, but I do really want to help people choose the right rooms, and help them realize that they really are a part of the things that matter. Because when we feel like none of the rooms we are in matter, that’s when we’re really lost.”
“These are the lies our brains tell us to push happiness out of reach. What is the evolutionary purpose of that? Is happiness stagnation? Maybe. Maybe life (all life, not just human life) is nothing more than wanting something and being able to go for it. What is life without want? Satisfaction sounds lovely, but evolutionarily it was selected against.”
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